Breast Health Navigator Challenge: Overseeing Patient’s Surgical Arm Range of Motion Restoration

One of the major roles of a Breast Health Navigator is to see that each post-operative patient, after undergoing a lumpectomy or mastectomy, has her physical range of motion restored to her surgical arm.  Most often, the patient is given written instructions and instructed to perform a set of recommended range of motion exercises at home until their physical range of motion is restored.  She is then expected to perform the recommended exercises at home under her own initiative.

Some women accept the challenge and perform the exercises as instructed, while some find it difficult to read the instructions and perform the exercises.  Having a coach, either a support partner or a healthcare professional, increases the likelihood the patient will be consistent and achieve full range of motion before they discontinue the program either from boredom or frustration.

Failure to perform the exercises and restore range of motion can result in future limited use of the arm.  This can cause difficulties with everyday tasks, such as zipping a back zipper or combing hair using the surgical arm. Occasionally, failure to exercise can result in a frozen shoulder which extremely limits normal movement and causes stiffness and pain.  Frozen shoulder occurs from scarring, thickening and shrinkage of the capsule that surrounds the normal shoulder joint.

Treatment of a frozen shoulder usually requires an aggressive combination of anti-inflammatory medication, cortisone injections into the shoulder and physical therapy. Without aggressive treatment, a frozen shoulder can be permanent. Physical therapy is often essential for recovery and can include ultrasound, electric stimulation, range of motion exercise maneuvers, stretching, ice packs and eventually strengthening exercises. Physical therapy can take weeks to months for full recovery, depending on the severity of the scarring of the tissues around the shoulder.

It is essential that patients are encouraged to comply with the stretching and range of motion exercises to avoid either limited movement or having a frozen shoulder.

Some large breast centers address the problem of compliance by referring patients to a Physical Therapist or to a post-surgical group exercise program for patients.  Patient compliance increases with increased encouragement from the personal interaction when attending a group or from the personal coaching provided by the Physical Therapist.  But what about the woman who has time and travel constraints and this is not a viable option?  For these women, achieving maximum rehabilitation can be a challenge.

A good solution is a new DVD, the Breast Cancer Survivor’s Guide to Physical Restoration, written and directed by a Dr. Suzanne Martin a Physical Therapist.  It is now available for breast cancer patients for at-home coaching. Dr. Martin’s video provides instruction for a complete physical rehabilitation program through a 30-minute daily workout program. The DVD includes nutritional guidelines along with a daily Pilates workout to increase core stability and strength. The video is designed for post-op rehab from breast cancer related surgeries including lumpectomy, mastectomy and reconstruction. Dr. Martin includes a self-test to measure surgical arm range of motion, a chest wall lymphatic massage demonstration and the foundation for restoring core strength and posture. The video is 108 minutes in length.  The cost is $19.95, making it affordable for most patients.

For Breast Health Navigators, this is an excellent answer to the challenge of surgical arm physical rehab and an excellent tool to recommend to patients. For women who cannot afford to purchase the video, it could be purchased by the facility and loaned out to patients during their arm rehab period after surgery and then returned to the facility. The DVD can be ordered here. Or, you may contact Balanced Body by phone at 1-800-745-2837.

Have any of you used this video yourself or with your patients. What are your thoughts on it?

 

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